Polling

Workshop by
Harry Enten & Neil Paine, FiveThirtyEight

Panel

Hosted by Thomson Rueters
Polling Sept 24 & Oct 5

Mapping & Cartography

Talk by
Al Shaw, ProPublica & Michal Migurski, Mapzen

Workshop by
Derek Watkins, The New York Times
Mapping Oct 14 & 15

Virtual Reality

Talk by
Raney Aronson-Rath, FRONTLINE, PBS

Workshop by
Marcelle Hopkins, The New York Times & Matt MacVey, CUNY
Virtual Reality Nov 18 & 19

Illustration

Panel with
Andrew Horton, Alissa Levin, Victor Juhasz & Ellen Weinstein

Workshop by
Ellen Weinstein
Illustration Dec 2 & 3

Network Analysis

Networks Jan 27 & 28

Visualization

Visualization Feb 17 & 18

Documents as Data

Typography March 24 & 25

News Products

News Products April 21 & 22
Polling Series 1

Polling

Workshop: September 24 from 10am-5pm
Panel: October 5

Workshop: Saturday, September 24 from 10am-5pm

with Harry Enten & Neil Paine, FiveThirtyEight

The first workshop in the Transparency Series takes you through techniques for looking at one or more polls over time. Your instructor is Harry Enten, a senior political analyst at FiveThirtyEight. He will be assisted by his colleague Neil Paine, another talented data journalist and sportswriter. The day-long workshop will present tools and strategies for working with polls — starting at the very beginning with simple random samples, and leading to the detailed models that are employed today. All the while, we will emphasize how to find and tell interesting, novel stories with polls. No prior experience in statistics or data analysis is needed.

Bios: Harry Enten is a senior political analyst and writer for FiveThirtyEight, a data journalism website. He studies polling and demographic trends to try and tell readers who and why candidates and parties win and lose elections. Previously, he was a writer with The Guardian in New York. Harry graduated from Dartmouth College. At Dartmouth, he started his own blog Margin of Error, where he blogged about political statistics. Neil Paine is a senior sportswriter at FiveThirtyEight, with writing on all of the major American sports. Before joining FiveThirtyEight, Neil was a Basketball Analytics Consultant for the Atlanta Hawks and also worked for Sports Reference LLC. Neil is a graduate of Georgia Tech.


Panel: Wednesday, October 5

co-organized and hosted by Thomson Reuters

Join us in at Reuters for a discussion on polling and its importance in the presidential race. As the 2016 election nears, we pore over opinion polls looking for subtle (or not so subtle) clues about how things will fare on November 8. We say Clinton is ahead because most of the polls have her ahead, yet there are polls that have Trump ahead. Which polls are right? Or reliable? To journalists, of course, the polls themselves aren't the story, they help tell us a story. The narrative power of polls extends far beyond a single number on a given day. Taken collectively and in combination with other data, we can tell deep stories about the nature of our public’s opinions.


mapping Series 2

Mapping & Cartography

Talk: October 14 at 5pm
Workshop: October 15 from 10am-5pm

Talk: Friday, October 14 at 5pm

The world has always been a connected system, and it's only becoming more so. As a form of journalism, maps contextualize the world by visually linking events to each other and to their geographic surroundings. Join the Brown Institute as we welcome Al Shaw, developer at ProPublica and Michal Migurski, VP of Product at Mapzen to talk about mapping in the context of journalism.

Al Shaw is a developer at ProPublica's News Applications desk. He has published numerous visualizations and analyses on disaster mapping. His latest interactive story "Hell and High Water" includes a map with seven animated simulations depicting a large hurricane hitting the Houston-Galveston region. He's also released open source tools to make it easier for newsrooms to produce maps quickly. From 2008 to November 2010, Al was Designer/Developer at Talking Points Memo, where he redesigned the homepage and news blogs, and created the first version of TPM PollTracker. He attended the University of Chicago, where he studied modern Middle Eastern language and culture.

Michal Migurski is currently the Vice President of Product for Mapzen, an open and accessible mapping platform. Migurski is also the CTO for Code for America, a Bay Area non-profit organization helping make government digital services "beautiful, simple, and easy to use." Previously, Migurski spent nine years as a partner and technology director at the celebrated San Francisco design studio Stamen. At Stamen, he oversaw inventive and powerful mapping and data visualization projects, focusing on ways to encourage the public to participate in collecting and representing data. Migurski holds a degree in Cognitive Science from UC Berkeley.



Workshop: Saturday, October 15 from 10am-5pm

with Derek Watkins, New York Times

If your story prompts questions like "What caused this to happen where it did?" or "Does this happen the same way in other places?", a map can probably help illuminate things for your readers. Once the exclusive domain of specialized practitioners, new tools make it easier and easier to analyze spatial data and publish maps online. Derek Watkins, a Graphics Editor at The New York Times, will give a day-long crash course in dealing with geographic data, designing elegant maps, and putting them on the internet. The overarching goal will be learning practical ways that maps can be used as a tool for journalists to tell more compelling stories.

Derek Watkins is a Graphics Editor at The New York Times, where he works as a designer, developer, reporter and geographer to visually present the news. Projects he's been involved with there have been recognized by the Society for News Design, Malofiej, the Ellies and the Emmys. He holds a Master's in Geography from the University of Oregon.

virtual reality Series 3

Virtual Reality

Talk: November 18 at 5pm
Workshop: November 19 from 10am-5pm
Raney Aronson-Rath
Raney Aronson
@raneyaronson

Talk: Friday, November 18 at 5pm

Join the Brown Institute in welcoming Raney Aronson-Rath, Executive Producer at FRONTLINE, PBS to talk about virtual reality, and its role in how we tell stories. With the recent explosion of VR – specifically 360-degree video– journalistic outlets are hungry for quality documentary content for immersive platforms. While immersive media experiences have become increasingly prevalent in the gaming and entertainment industry, we are only beginning to explore them within the context of documentary photography and journalism. How can media makers use immersion as a tool to build empathy, engage communities, and forward social change? How does immersing your viewer in content change the nature of the story you are telling? And how does this mode of experiencing a story change how journalists approach the planning, creation, and distribution of stories?

Raney Aronson-Rath leads FRONTLINE, PBS’ flagship investigative journalism series. She has been internationally recognized for her work to expand FRONTLINE’s reporting capacity, reimagine the documentary form across multiple platforms, and report and tell stories that matter in new, creative ways. Under Aronson-Rath’s leadership, FRONTLINE has won every major award in broadcast journalism, earned new funding to expand its investigative capacity and dramatically expanded its digital footprint. Under Aronson-Rath, FRONTLINE has produced several groundbreaking documentaries in VR — “Return to Chernobyl,” “On the Brink of Famine,” and “Ebola Outbreak” — and they will expand their exploration of virtual reality in journalism with a large grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Prior to FRONTLINE, Aronson-Rath worked at ABC News, The Wall Street Journal, and MSNBC. She earned her bachelor’s degree in South Asian studies and history from the University of Wisconsin, and received her master’s from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.



Marcelle Hopkins
Marcelle Hopkins
@marcellehopkins
Matt MacVey
Matt MacVey
@Matt_MacVey

Workshop: Saturday, November 19 from 10am-5pm

with Marcelle Hopkins, New York Times & Matt MacVey, CUNY

The Virtual Reality workshop will take students who have little to no background in virtual reality and teach them the fundamentals of working in the medium. Journalists seeking to expand their storytelling beyond the still image and written word are encouraged to join. Selected participants will gain critical insights into emerging digital strategies in order to engage audiences across new immersive platforms.

The lab will commence with a discussion around exemplary case studies, and will then challeng participants to develop their own immersive story projects. Mixing theory with practice, participants will walk away from this lab with a concrete grasp of how they might integrate immersive storytelling into their practice and what that means for their subjects, audience, and impact.

Matt MacVey is developing immersive journalism curriculum and workshops at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. Matt wrote a report about immersive media for the NYC Media Lab and worked on interactive stories in the exhibitions department at the American Museum of Natural History.

Marcelle Hopkins is the Executive Producer for 360 News at The New York Times. Before joining The Times, she produced and directed virtual reality documentaries for FRONTLINE and Emblematic Group. In the past two years, she has received a reporting fellowship from the International Women's Media Foundation, a Magic Grant from the Brown Institute for Media Innovation, a Ford Foundation JustFilms fellowship at the Made in NY Media Center by IFP, and a United Nations Correspondents Association award. She spent seven years at Al Jazeera's UN bureau, where she produced TV news packages, interviews, features and documentaries.

virtual reality Series 4

Illustration

Talk: December 2 at 5pm
Workshop: December 3 from 10am-5pm

Panel: Friday, December 2 at 5pm

Word and image work together to produce beautifully told stories. Metaphor, humor and empathy are powerful visual tools to further engage a reader. Join us in the Brown Institute for a Friday night panel discussion with Andrew Horton, Alissa Levin, and Victor Juhasz on illustration as it relates to journalism. The panel will be moderated by Ellen Weinstein, who will conduct the Illustration workshop on Saturday.

Andrew Horton is the Creative Director of the Village Voice, Andrew Horton has previously led the art departments of Business Week, Billboard and Advertising Age. He has worked for magazines such as New York, Newsweek, Rolling Stone and Salt-Water Sportsman, and can consume his bodyweight in Vegemite.

Alissa Levin is founder and principal of Point Five, a New York City-based design studio specializing in work with an educational or cultural focus. Her work has been recognized by American Illustration, American Society of Magazine Editors, Society of Illustrators, Society of Publication Designers, and the Webbys. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Alissa is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design.

Since 1974 (graduate of Parsons ’75) award winning Victor Juhasz has illustrated for many of the major magazines, newspapers, book publishers, advertising agencies, both national and international. For the past decade he has divided his time between humorous illustration and realistic visual documentation- witness art. He is a frequent contributor of satirical images to the National Affairs section of Rolling Stone Magazine. His representational work is part of the permanent collection of the US Air Force and, soon, the US Marine Corps. In August, 2011, he embedded with the 1-52nd Arctic Thunder Dustoff (helicopter medical evacuation) in Kandahar, Afghanistan. His artwork and writing appeared in GQ online in July 2012. He has covered the training exercises of USAF Combat Control and Pararescue teams as well as the Marines, most recently on the USS Bataan Navy/Marine Corps joint training exercises.



Workshop: Saturday, December 3 from 10am-5pm

with Ellen Weinstein

Journalistic outlets like The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Atlantic and Nautilus use illustration as an important part of its content. A strong visual will draw a reader to a story. In this day long workshop, Ellen Weinstein, world-renowned illustrator and frequent contributor to many publications, will introduce basic visual thinking skills that will lead you through visualizing a story from text. How do you employ visual metaphors without being cliché? How do you create visual empathy with a subject? When is humor appropriate? During the day, we will create, discuss and think about word and image, not as separate entities but as halves of a whole.

Ellen Weinstein was born and raised in New York City. She is a graduate of Pratt Institute and New York’s High School of Art and Design. Awards include American Illustration, Society of Illustrators, Communication Arts Illustration Annual, Print’s Regional Design Annual, Society of Publication Designers, Society of News Designers and the Art Directors Club. She has judged numerous illustration competitions including Communication Arts Illustration Annual 2016, 2016 National Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, AOI/World Illustration Awards, Society of Illustrators Annual exhibition, Society of Illustrators Student Scholarship and Society of Illustrators Zankel Scholarship. She’s featured in an eight-page article in the March/April 2013 issue of Communication Arts. Ellen’s work is also featured in Illustration Now 5! by Taschen.

Ellen exhibits her work in local New York galleries as well as galleries in the US and Italy. She lectures and conducts workshops in various art schools and internationally including Ilustratour in Madrid, Spain, Fig.o5 Congreso Internacional de Ilustracion in Bogota, Colombia, MFAStudy in Beijing, China, MiMaster Ilustrazione in Milan, Italy, CEDRA Education in Moscow, Russia, Associazione Culturale Teatrio in Venice, Italy, Amarillo Design Space in Xalapa, Mexico and at ICON6 The Illustration Conference. She is an instructor at the Rhode Island School of Design and a guest lecturer at The Brown Institute for Media Innovation at Columbia Journalism School in New York City.

Ellen was the President of ICON8 The Illustration Conference that was held July 9-12, 2014 in Portland Oregon. She also served as the Programming Chair for ICON7. Ellen is on the Board of Directors of the Society of Illustrators and serves as Chairperson of the Museum Committee. Website: ellenweinstein.com