The Transparency Series
About
2018/2019
2017/2018
2016/2017
2015/2016

Drone Photography
Apr 12/13 2019
Talk: Josh Haner, New York Times
Workshop: USA Today Unmanned Aerial Systems Team

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Apr 12 2019 at 5pm
Join us on Friday evening for our last Transparency Series seminar featuring Josh Haner, staff photographer and the senior editor for photo technology at The New York Times to talk about his work with drones as a mode of capture in the field. As with Virtual Reality, drone journalism offers opportunities in data collection and visual representation afforded by few other technologies that are within the grasp of a typical newsroom. Drones, or unmanned aerial systems, provide a perspective that is truly unique. It seems to be good for providing a sense of scale (moving from the ground to a significant vantage point above some event or phenomenon). Drones can provide access to regions that are otherwise impossible to film. The artful, informative deployment of drone photography and its role in journalism is the subject of this Transparency Series event.


Apr 13 2019 from 9am-5pm
On Saturday, we will get our hands dirty and take a field trip north of NYC and give students the chance to both pilot small drones as well as stage shots from the robotic, onboard camera. The workshop will be led by the Unmanned Aerial Systems Team from USA Today, led by Andy Scott.

apr 12/13 2019

Drone Photography
Talk: Josh Haner, New York Times
Workshop: USA Today Unmanned Aerial Systems Team

Polling
Oct 12/13 2018
Talk: Amanda Cox, New York Times
Workshop: Dhrumil Mehta & Janie Velencia, FiveThirtyEight

Register for the Talk | Apply for the Polling Workshop

Oct 12 2018 at 5pm
Join us for a discussion with Amanda Cox from the Upshot at the New York Times who will discuss polling and its importance in the political races. As the 2018 midterm election nears, we pore over opinion polls looking for subtle (or not so subtle) clues about how things will fare on November 6. When looking at the race for the house and for the senate, polls vary wildly. Which polls are right? Or reliable? To journalists, of course, the polls themselves aren't the story, they help tell us a story. The narrative power of polls extends far beyond a single number on a given day. Taken collectively and in combination with other data, we can tell deep stories about the nature of our public’s opinions.



Oct 13 2018 from 10am-5pm
The first workshop in the Transparency Series takes you through techniques for looking at one or more polls over time. Join Janie Velencia and Dhrumil Mehta who lead Pollapalooza at FiveThirtyEight to get exposed to sources, tools, and strategies for working with polls — starting at the very beginning with simple random samples, and leading to the detailed models that are employed today. All the while, we will emphasize how to find and tell interesting, novel stories with polls. No prior experience in statistics or data analysis is needed.

oct 12/13 2018

Polling
Talk: Amanda Cox, New York Times
Workshop: Dhrumil Mehta & Janie Velencia, FiveThirtyEight

Voice Interfaces
Nov 16/17 2018
Talk: Joseph Price, Washington Post & Tommy O'Keefe and Liz Danzico, NPR
Workshop: Ha-Hoa Hamano & Nara Kasbergen, NPR

Register for the Talk | Apply for the Workshop

Nov 16 2018 at 5pm
Voice assistants are changing the way people search for and consume content. By one estimate, half of the adults in the US make use of voice interfaces — for now, mostly on their smartphones. But with the steady improvement of voice recognition, smart speakers like Amazon’s Echo, Google Home, Apple’s HomePod constitute new platforms for accessing information. How will journalism fare in this new ecosystem? Obviously, a direct reading of news stories written for the print or the web will tax the capabilities of current speech synthesis — not to mention the patience of a listener. In this discussion, we will get an overview of the current voice experience ecosystem and hear about the voice promised land: why voice interfaces are so powerful and alluring and what the future will look like. We will also hear about first hand experiences from folks at The Washington Post and NPR.


Nov 17 2018 from 10am-5pm
Authoring experiences for a voice assistant or smart speaker is a combination of several distinct skillsets. Some conversational interfaces are driven by keywords, depending on users stating specific terms, while others involve artificial intelligence to create more natural conversations around content. The content itself is a product of both editorial work as well as programming effort to implement the conversation in code. In this workshop, students will prototype a journalistic application for a smart speaker. We will focus on Amazon’s Alexa platform and use simple graphical interfaces to design content delivery. Emphasis will be on developing insights into what makes a good conversation, reformatting and focusing on journalism that translates well to the platform.

nov 16/17 2018

Voice Interfaces
Talk: Joseph Price, Washington Post & Tommy O'Keefe and Liz Danzico, NPR
Workshop: Ha-Hoa Hamano & Nara Kasbergen, NPR

Reporting on Devices
Dec 3/8, 2018
Talk: Surya Mattu, Gizmodo
Workshop: Consumer Reports Digital Standards Team

Register for the Talk | Apply for the Workshop

Dec 3 2018 at 5pm
More than ever, objects in our homes and on our person are connected, sharing data about our lived experience with companies and with the public. How do we measure what our devices collect about us, and more importantly, what they share? Join us for a conversation with Surya Mattu, an artist, engineer and journalist who will share with us a variety of stories that investigate connected devices. Mattu is currently a data reporter at Gizmodo, an R&D Journalism Resident at Eyebeam and a Research Scientist at the Center for Civic Media. Previously, Mattu was a contributing researcher at ProPublica.


Dec 8 2018 from 10am-5pm
Most consumer advocacy is based on a definition of consumer rights anchored on two things: value and safety. While these issues are perennial concerns for consumers, they don’t capture the larger threats posed by the 21st C marketplace: reductions in individual agency and control. Amazon, Google, Facebook, and the other corporate powers offer products that don’t pose traditional ‘safety’ threats. In this workshop we start with the hypothesis that the consumer movement has mostly ‘solved for the 20th C.’ Products are better, safer, and cheaper than ever. That what we need, instead, is a new framework anchored in contemporary threats to agency and control. And from this framework, new models for product ratings, consumer decision-making, and so on, for evaluating network-connected devices and “apps.” We will explore this new terrain through the lens of Consumer Reports’ new Digital Standard. We will apply both technical as well as analytical tools to examine how to report on connected devices and “apps.”

dec 3/8 2018

Reporting on Devices
Talk: Surya Mattu, Gizmodo
Workshop: Consumer Reports Digital Standards Team

Data Visualization
Feb 15/16 2019
Talk: Jeremy White, New York Times
Workshop: Agnes Chang, ProPublica

Register for the Talk | Apply for the Workshop

Feb 15 2019 at 5pm
Maps, charts, and graphs have become an almost essential part of the journalistic practice, as well as the centerpiece of many published pieces. But how can we best incorporate these tools into our investigative process, and how do we design them to be as engaging and insightful as possible? Join us for a conversation with Jeremy White, graphics editor at The New York Times, who will share with us some of the lessons learned and the details behind the crafting of pieces such as the now famous Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek, and Reshaping New York, and the more contemporary Antarctic Dispatches, See Inside Typhoon Mangkhut and the Times Olympics coverage. Jeremy White is a graphics editor for The New York Times and an adjunct professor at Columbia University. He has contributed to a variety of visual projects that have earned several Emmy nominations, a Peabody award, and top honors from the Society of News Design, World Press Photo and Pictures of the Year International.


Feb 16 2019 from 10am-5pm
Data visualization has become a multipurpose tool in journalistic practice. It allows us to see patterns in data and to discover new stories, as well as to insightfully communicate our findings. In this day-long workshop, Agnes Chang from ProPublica will guide us through basic data visualization tools and skills, delving into the design process and some of the graphic strategies that make the best data visualization pieces so successful. During the day we will touch upon the multiple aspects of data visualization: from exploring and cleaning up a dataset, to crafting the narrative of the piece, to designing its graphic aspects, to coding its interactive elements. Agnes Chang is an editorial experience designer at ProPublica. Previously, she spent six years at the New York Times where she launched the company’s proprietary 360 video player and also led user strategy and daily operations for NYT Cooking, one of the Times’ most popular products.

feb 15/16 2019

Data Visualization
Talk: Jeremy White, New York Times
Workshop: Agnes Chang, ProPublica

Digital Security
Mar 14 2019
Talk: Runa Sandvik, New York Times

Register for the Talk

Mar 14 2019 at 4pm
Runa Sandvik joined The New York Times in 2016 to build a security program dedicated to the newsroom, putting the focus on the security maturity of the newsroom; the desks; and individual reporters. In doing so, Sandvik built on experience from her time at The Tor Project, Freedom of the Press Foundation, consulting for established media organizations and working closely with independent freelancers around the world. In this presentation, Sandvik will share lessons learned while building this program, talk about the challenges reporters are facing both online and offline, and discuss ways in which we can empower security teams elsewhere to support their high-risk users.

Runa Sandvik is the Senior Director of Information Security at The New York Times, focusing on defense, incident response, and innovative solutions for journalistic security. Sandvik loves to travel and has spoken at numerous conferences around the world. She is a former developer with The Tor Project, a technical advisor to the Freedom of the Press Foundation and a member of the review board for Black Hat Europe. She tweets as @runasand.Register at brwn.co/sandvik.

mar 14 2019

Digital Security
Talk: Runa Sandvik, New York Times